James Fazio

James Fazio

James Fazio is Dean of Bible and Theology, Professor of Biblical Studies at Southern California Seminary. Fazio has a BA (2002), MA (2005), ThM (2013), and DMin (2-17) from Southern California Seminary. He is currently working on a PhD in history from Queen’s University in Belfast Ireland. In 2011 James accepted the position as Dean of the College at SCS. In 2015 his responsibilities expanded to include oversight of all undergraduate and graduate biblical studies programs at Southern California Seminary. Between 2007 and 2017 James served as President of Uganda Ministries, which launched significant educational initiatives, including the development of two schools in the Rukungiri District of western Uganda. His persistent work in Uganda has brought him to serve on the board of White Fields, an international church planting and leadership development organization that is active in several countries across Asia, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. James and his wife Amy have four children. His website is https://www.socalsem.edu/southern-california-seminary-blog/.

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Almost without fail, as I’ve mentioned the title of the upcoming book “Discovering Dispensationalism: Tracing the Development of Dispensational Thought from the First to the Twenty-First Century” I’m co-editing, alongside my colleague, Cory M. Marsh, anyone generally conversant on church history and theology has tended to respond with a degree of skepticism, if not incredulity. Afterall, how can one trace the development of dispensational thought back to the first century, while its widely recognized that dispensationalism didn’t arrive on the scene until the mid-nineteenth century? Ostensibly, dispensationalism had not been conceived until the Anglo-Irish clergyman, John Nelson Darby (1800-1882), introduced his novel ideas to the world at-large through a series of eleven lectures delivered in the French language at Geneva in 1840. These lectures, known as “The Hopes of the Church of God, in connection with the Destiny of the Jews and the Nations, as Revealed in Prophecy,” have been commonly regarded as the initial emergence of dispensationalism. ...